Last edited by Vushura
Saturday, May 9, 2020 | History

9 edition of Soviet and kosher found in the catalog.

Soviet and kosher

Jewish popular culture in the Soviet Union, 1923-1939

by Anna Shternshis

  • 137 Want to read
  • 12 Currently reading

Published by Indiana University Press in Bloomington .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Soviet Union,
  • Soviet Union.
    • Subjects:
    • Jews -- Soviet Union -- History,
    • Jewish communists -- Soviet Union,
    • Jews -- Identity -- Soviet Union,
    • Jews -- Soviet Union -- Social conditions,
    • Jews -- Soviet Union -- Intellectual life,
    • Popular culture -- Soviet Union,
    • Yiddish literature -- Soviet Union -- History and criticism,
    • Jaws in popular culture -- Soviet Union

    • Edition Notes

      Includes bibliographical references and index.

      StatementAnna Shternshis.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsDS135.R9 S5227 2006
      The Physical Object
      Paginationp. cm.
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL3410631M
      ISBN 100253347262, 0253218411
      LC Control Number2005026653

      Anna Shternshis, Soviet and Kosher: Jewish Popular Culture in the Soviet Union, – Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press, Henry Felix Srebrnik, Dreams of Nationhood: American Jewish Communists and the Soviet Birobidzhan Project, Country: Russia.   From Russia, With Mayonnaise: Cookbook Revisits Soviet Classics: The Salt The dishes that marked the Soviet era still have a strong pull on .

      "Papirosn" (Yiddish: פּאַפּיראָסן ‎, transl. Cigarettes) is a Yiddish song that was written in the s. The song tells the story of a Jewish boy who sells cigarettes to survive on the streets. He depicts his tragic fate; having lost his parents, his younger sister has died on the bench, and eventually he loses his own hope. The song's author Herman Yablokoff was a member of the.   The law of unintended consequences defines Anna Shternshis' fascinating new book, Soviet and Kosher: Jewish Popular Culture in the Soviet Union. After the Bolshevik Revolution in , the new Soviet government enacted policies to eliminate perceived injustices from the tsarist regime and to turn its multiethnic empire into a Soviet nation.

        In the CCCP Cook Book, Olga and Pavel Syutkin showcase the bounty of Soviet cuisine through the lens of social of the images from the .   By then my book on Soviet anti-Semitism, The Unredeemed, had been released, but fortunately Soviet surveillance was not keeping abreast of the American publishing industry. Ostensibly, our mission was research on the excellent record of the USSR in preventing crime, but we were really there to raise the issue of Jewish suffering at the highest.


Share this book
You might also like
River harvest

River harvest

The Casebook of Sherlock Holmes

The Casebook of Sherlock Holmes

problem in Greek ethics

problem in Greek ethics

Conversation in the elementary school.

Conversation in the elementary school.

William K. Lovett.

William K. Lovett.

Ghost towns of the Northwest

Ghost towns of the Northwest

The Supper Book

The Supper Book

Proposal for a Nile waters treaty

Proposal for a Nile waters treaty

Biology of the seas of the U.S.S.R.

Biology of the seas of the U.S.S.R.

The Passage

The Passage

A daring proposition

A daring proposition

Legacy of heroes

Legacy of heroes

Soviet and kosher by Anna Shternshis Download PDF EPUB FB2

Great book, lots of great and largely unknown history here. I really enjoyed the oral history examples in the book, which made the history feel a lot more 'human'. Some descriptions of how older soviet Jews saw jewishness reminded me of my grandparents and their relation to judiasm, and was eeringly accurate.4/5(2).

" everything is illuminated by Ms. Shternshis in Soviet and Kosher: Jewish Popular Culture in the Soviet Union, – The book blends archival data with comments from men and women born between and in Russia and the Soviet Union and interviewed in New York, Minneapolis, Philadelphia, Berlin, and by: Soviet and Kosher is the first study of key Yiddish documents that brought these Soviet messages to Jews, notably the "Red Haggadah," a Soviet parody of the traditional Passover manual; songs about Lenin and Stalin; scripts from regional theaters; Socialist Realist Cited by: Dear Parents and Teachers, As concerned mothers we have noticed that the quality and content of the books available to our children leaves much to be desired.

As voracious readers ourselves, we know that the words a child (or adult!) reads can leave a permanent impression on his or her neshama. Kosher pork―an oxymoron. Anna Shternshis’s fascinating study traces the creation of a Soviet Jewish identity that disassociated Jewishness from Judaism.

The cultural transformation of Soviet Jews between and was one of the most ambitious experiments in social engineering of. Find helpful customer reviews and review ratings for Soviet and Kosher: Jewish Popular Culture in the Soviet Union, at Read honest and unbiased product reviews from our users/5.

“ everything is illuminated by Ms. Shternshis in Soviet and Kosher: Jewish Popular Culture in the Soviet Union, – The book blends archival data with comments from men and women born between and in Russia and the Soviet Union and interviewed in New York, Minneapolis, Philadelphia, Berlin, and Moscow.

Get this from a library. Soviet and kosher: Jewish popular culture in the Soviet Union, [Anna Shternshis] -- Kosher pork--an oxymoron. Anna Shternshis's fascinating study traces the creation of a Soviet Jewish identity that disassociated Jewishness from.

Buy Soviet and Kosher: Jewish Popular Culture in the Soviet Union, by Anna Shternshis (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store. Everyday low prices and free delivery on /5(2). Get this from a library. Soviet and Kosher.

[Anne Shternshis] -- Anna Shternshis's fascinating study traces the creation of a Soviet Jewish identity that disassociated Jewishness from Judaism. The cultural transformation of Soviet Jews between and was. Kosher pork -- an oxymoron. Anna Shternshis's fascinating study traces the creation of a Soviet Jewish identity that disassociated Jewishness from Judaism.

The cultural transformation of Soviet Jews between and was one of the most ambitious experiments in social engineering of the past century. During this period, Russian Jews went from relative isolation to being highly integrated. Olga GERSHENSON Anna Shternshis, Soviet and Kosher: Jewish Popular Culture in the Soviet Union, (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, ).

xxi+ pp., ill. ISBN: As its title promises,Anna Sternshis ’s new book examines Jewish popular culture in the pre-war Soviet Union. This lively, moving narrative provides the first comprehensive account of the emigration of nearlySoviet Jews to the United States between and By weaving a wide variety of immigrant voices and photographs together with historical, journalistic, social service, and psychological studies of Soviet Jewish immigration, this book offers a comprehensive and highly readable.

To these one should add Anna Shternshis, Soviet and Kosher: Jewish Popular Culture in the Soviet Union, (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, ); and Mordechai Altshuler, Religion and Jewish Identity in the Soviet Union.

The list of groups—ethnic Koreans, Latvians, Lithuanians, Estonians, Azeris, Kurds—“transferred” to Siberia and Soviet Central Asia under Stalin is long.

(The Book of Tasty and Healthy Food does not mention this, either.) There is a reason her restaurant is devoted to it, the cuisine of a country that no longer exists; you can taste it.

“Soviet and Kosher is a long overdue historical study of the role of popular culture in the formation of Soviet Jewish identity in the s and s. With clear, appealing prose and a highly original methodology, Anna Shternshis offers a fascinating exploration of the central paradox of the early Soviet Jewish experience”.

The law of unintended consequences defines Anna Shternshis' fascinating new book, Soviet and Kosher: Jewish Popuhr Culture in the Soviet Union. After the Bolshevik Revolution inthe new Soviet government enacted policies to eliminate perceived injustices from the tsarist regime and to turn its multiethnic empire into a Soviet nation.

Kosher pork-an oxymoron. Anna Shternshis's fascinating study traces the creation of a Soviet Jewish identity that disassociated Jewishness from Judaism. The cultural transformation of Soviet Jews between and was one of the most ambitious experiments in social engineering of the past century.

During this period, Russian Jews went from relative isolation to being highly integrated into. new book, Soviet and Kosher: Jewish Popular Culture in the Soviet Union. After the Bolshevik Revolution inthe new Soviet government enacted poli' cies to eliminate perceived injustices from the tsarist regime and to turn its multiethnic empire into a Soviet nation.

Soviet Jews were some of the biggest beneficiaries of these new policies. The design of the book is delicate and elegant, hinting at Soviet conservatism, and free of matryoshka dolls, balalaikas or symbols of used hammers and sickles.

Vadim Blumin, one of the authors, is a year-old historian who lives in Ramat Gan with his partner Roman and Author: Dafna Arad. Soviet and Kosher: Jewish Popular Culture in the Soviet Union, By Anna Shternshis Indiana University Press, pages, $ In the opening pages of her new book, “Soviet and Kosher.

Buy Soviet and Kosher by Anna Shternshis from Waterstones today! Click and Collect from your local Waterstones or get FREE UK delivery on orders over £Pages:   Extra Yarn – Kosher (possibly Glatt Kosher, if you’re okay with fantasy elements and girls in pants) Hereville: How Mirka Met a Meteorite – Kosher, for fantasy elements, but the Jewish stuff is spot on The Secret of the Stone Frog – Kosher, but weird (the kids liked it a lot, but it wasn’t my taste).